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this time I'm not even going to pretend that I tried.

 

Orgy

 

Despite the further stretching of the already-thin amount of "credibility" I have, it's time to talk about Orgy. What is Orgy? It's a Southern California band -- I know, sounds bad already -- that felt the need to combine electronic stuff with generic post-modern-rock guitar riffing. Despite what you might think about them, you have to admit it's kinda unique, at least in the circle of popular music. Oh, also, they have some sort of goth-glam image that's really rather silly. But then, I don't watch music videos, so it doesn't bother me.

lineup: Amir Derakh (some guitars), Jay Gordon (vocals), Paige Haley (bass), Bobby Hewitt (acoustic & electronic drums -- just like Invisible Touch!), Ryan Shuck (some more guitars).

review index: Candyass / Vapor Transmission

missing albums: none


Candyass - 1998

Rating: ***
Best songs: Blue Monday, Social Enemies... uh... did I mention Blue Monday?
Worst songs: Dizzy

 

Life was simpler back in 1998. The biggest problem the US faced was whether or not the President did it with an intern, George Lucas's disaster movie Star Wars: The Phantom Menace was still a year away, and bands could cover 80s new-wave songs and make them hits again. Does anyone remember Reel Big Fish's cover of "Take On Me"?

Does anyone even remember Reel Big Fish?

Neither do I.

Anyway, as this review grinds to a halt, let's change trains and talk about the first Orgy album. Actually, there's not a whole bunch to talk about, as the songs are generally constructed along the same means: generic nu-metal-esque guitar riff, some electronic drumming and occasional synthesizer effects, and chanteur Jay Gordon singing some fairly incomprehensible (or over-the-top, silly) lyrics around it. I know this doesn't really sound appealing, but in my ever-so-humble opinion this is actually a fairly fun album to listen to. And yes indeed, they cover "Blue Monday" in a fairly faithful rendition. The song was good the first time around, y'know. It's just missing the "ahhhhh" synth choir thing. Anyway, the songs that the band actually did write are fairly consistent: the opener "Social Enemies" sticks the needle into a nice little groove, and "Platinum" has some nice little chimey synth things stuck in there.

Okay, I realize that was really stretching. I have to admit I can't think of much to say. It's enjoyable (to me, at least) when it's on, but I can't really remember much about it when it's gone. So it gets three stars, and it's not even the Cars.

If I ever do that again, please slap me.


Vapor Transmission - 2000

Rating: ***
Best songs: Suckerface, Fiction (Dreams in Digital), Opticon
Worst songs: I don't know!

 

Two years later and they're pretty much doing the same thing. Actually, there are some slight differences: some of the songs are actually kinda fast, the production is a little less plasticky, and for no apparent reason about a third of the tracks fade out. Oh, and there's one of those annoying pointless "Intro" tracks at the beginning. And what is with these lyrics? I mean, for the most part they're still just incomprehensible, but I'm not even going to start with "The Odyssey", which contains some absolutley absurd turns of phrases. But I digress... Sort of. I don't know what the hell to say about this album, or indeed how to justify my liking it, but I do, so we're kinda stuck. I can't even say it's utterly generic, because it's really not your typical post-metal/nu-grunge/whatever album. I mean, the singer actually bothers to sing, for one. So I guess I'll give it my "I like it, but I don't know why" rating.


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